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Top 3 Best Cat Tree For Large Cats Choices For Maximum Comfort

Disclaimer

As a Chewy and Amazon affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases. This does not impact our reviews and comparisons.

What is the best cat tree for large cats?

Cats need room to climb, stretch, hide, and survey their territory. A cat tree provides all these features to improve your cat’s happiness and lower stress.

There’s a tonne of cat trees to look at online, but many aren’t durable enough to accommodate a large cat. This will lead to frustration for you and your cat.

In this article, I’ll help you with product recommendations and buying tips.

My name is Derrick, and I write for Simply Cat Care.

My goal with this website is to help cat owners learn more about taking care of their cats. I am not a veterinarian and I recommend seeking the advice of a vet for any further questions.

In this article, I’ll help you find the best cat tree for large cats. I’ll also give you a buying guide and cover some frequently asked questions.

Let’s get into the article.

Best Cat Tree For Large Cats: Top Picks

Best Cat Tree For Large Cats Overall

Hey-bro Extra Large Multi-Level Cat Tree Condo

Durable for large cats

Easy to assemble

Two condos for hiding fun

Sisal scratching posts

Top perches may not be wide enough

No horizontal scratching options

Why Do I Recommend This Cat Tree?

The Hey-bro Extra Large Multi-Level Cat Tree Condo is a top-rated durable cat tree suited for larger cats to enjoy.

The main benefit of this product is it has all the features which benefit cats. This includes two condos for hiding to reduce stress. There are also sisal scratching posts to keep your cat from tearing up your expensive furniture.

Unfortunately, the top two perches are a little small for some cats. A very large cat might still need even more room to move.

A horizontal scratching option is mandatory for some cats, and this might steer you clear of this option.

Product Specifications

  • Colors: Light gray, Smoky gray, or Beige
  • Product weight: 37.9lbs (17.2 kg)
  • Product size: 21.7″L x 15.7″W x 58.3″H
  • Material: Particleboard, linenette, sisal rope
  • Platforms: 4
  • Condo’s: 2

Best Cat Tree For Large Cats Runner Up

Le Sure Cat Tree for Large Indoor Cats

Sturdy base for large cats

Two condos for hiding fun

Scratching posts

Affordable

Low maximum height

Difficult instructions to follow

Why Do I Recommend This Cat Tree?

The Le sure Cat Tree for Large Indoor Cats is a more ‘bare bones’ affordable cat tree with plenty of space to allow a large cat to rest and play.

The main benefit is the use of two condo hiding spots to reduce stress. This tree also has a scratching pad for exercise.

Downsides include the height which is only 86cm. However, this gives the tree more stability on the ground.

Some of the instructions for assembly are hard to follow, and won’t suit someone who isn’t keen on DIY.

Product Specifications

  • Colors: Beige or grey
  • Product weight: 22.95 pounds
  • Product size: 20 x 18.5 x 7.5 inches
  • Material: Sisal and plush bedding
  • Platforms: 3
  • Condo’s: 2

Best Cat Tree For Large Cats for Height

Hey-brother Multi-Level Cat Tree

Sturdy base to keep large cat secure

Two condos for hiding fun

Scratching posts for exercise

Monster height for vertical lovers

Easy assembly

Some cats may tear the bedding

Sisal fabric is a little thin

Why Do I Recommend This Cat Tree?

The Hey-brother Multi-Level Cat Tree suits large cats who love climbing.

This tree is 60 inches tall and gives your cat a chance to enjoy watching birds out the window (‘Cat TV’). The tree has a sturdy wood base for durability.

The main downside is there is only one condo and some thin bedding.

There’s also only one condo, which limits use for multiple cats.

Product Specifications

  • Colors: Beige, light grey, or smoky grey
  • Product weight: 43.85 pounds
  • Product size: 24 x 17 x 12 inches
  • Material: Sisal and plush bedding
  • Platforms: 5
  • Condo’s 1

Buying Guide: Best Cat Tree For Large Cats

Need a durable cat tree to hold a larger cat?

Cat trees reduce stress and provide entertainment. They also serve as beds and ways to survey their territory.

Getting a cat tree that isn’t durable is a costly mistake.

In this buying guide, I’ll help you with things to look for when choosing a cat tree for a large cat.

A cat hiding in a cat tree.

What should you do before buying a cat tree?

Before investing in a cat tree you want to get an understanding of what will work best for your cat.

This involves two main things:

  1. Is your cat a vertical or horizontal scratcher?
  2. What fabric does your cat like to scratch?

Start by getting a variety of fabrics (e.g. sisal, wood) to see if your cat will like the texture on its claws. Also, note whether they want to stretch out vertically to scratch or want a horizontal surface.

This will influence your cat tree buying decision as the tree acts as a scratching post and general hub for your cat. It will ensure you get the maximum value out of your purchase.

What is sisal?

Sisal is a material that provides a texture similar to tree bark. Sisal is a durable material that cats generally find satisfying to sink their claws into and get a positive response.

Faux fleece is also used for cat trees, and trees can also be made of – trees. Cats really like scratching bark and posts made of bark might be right up your cat’s alley.

Cat Tree Checklist

Here is a list of things to look for when choosing a cat tree for large cats.

  • Stable upright post that does not fall over
  • Horizontal and vertical surfaces for scratching posts
  • Scratching surface that is 3 feet tall above the base
  • Choose a loosely woven fabric to cover the tree platforms
  • Fabric that can be replaced
  • Large enough space for your cat to climb and rest on the perches
  • Easy assembly
  • Able to accommodate multiple cats if present in the house
  • Avoid exposed metal parts and staples
  • Neutral color tones for your house
  • Able to reach a window for sunlight (on the perch)

When choosing a cat tree for a large cat, make sure each platform has enough width to accommodate them. Most cat trees are slim and ‘aesthetic’, but this won’t be able to properly keep large cats comfortable.

A woman following a checklist.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is A Cat Tree?

A cat tree is a place for resting, perching, hiding, and scratching.

It’s similar to a tree in that it contains many branches (which usually contain perches and/or condos). The cat tree is a form of environmental enrichment to help lower stress and increase fun.

Bottom Line: A cat tree is a place for resting, perching, hiding, and scratching.

A cat tree with a cat resting.

What Are The Benefits Of A cat Tree?

Cat trees help lower stress.

A cat tree is a form of environmental enrichment. Indoor cats, in particular, have less opportunity for play, hunting, and climbing. This can lead to behavioral problems, increased risk of obesity, and stress.

Cat trees are a way of increasing the space in a location, especially cramped spaces like apartments.

This helps improve your cat’s quality of life.

Hiding spaces (in the form of condos) give cats a sense of security. Cats like being able to conceal their location instinctively as hunters. In one study, for example, a lack of hiding spaces resulted in cats using the litter box to try to hide.

Obviously, something as simple as a box is better than nothing, but trees offer more overall benefits.

Bottom Line: Cat trees help lower stress and improve quality of life.

A cat relaxing on a cat tree perch.

Why Do Cats Love Trees?

Cat trees help engage a cat’s natural instinct to climb and survey the territory.

They are also giving them a place to hide and feel secure. If set up strategically, it also allows them to enjoy some views out of a window.

Cat trees are like playgrounds for cats.

Bottom Line: Cat trees are a way to help your cat enjoy climbing, perching, hiding, and surveying territory.

A cat perching on a cat tree.

Do All Cats Like Climbing?

Senior cats with mobility issues have a harder time climbing.

14% of older cats with osteoarthritis are also obese, meaning large cats have a tougher time using most cat trees.

This doesn’t mean these cats don’t like climbing but need more accommodation. This includes a tree with more steps and ramps to help get to higher levels.

Bottom Line: Senior, obese, and cats with osteoarthritis tend to have a harder time with climbing and need more ramps.

An assisted platform to help a cat walk off their cat tree.

Are Cat Trees Dangerous?

Cat trees are as safe as the build quality.

To that end, it’s best to check over the reviews of a product to find any issues. Some products may collapse with the weight of a cat due to weaker structures, or contain choking hazards.

It’s best to choose a product with a wide and sturdy base. For large cats, it’s best to have wider perches for more room to stretch out.

Bottom Line: Cat trees are as safe as the build quality. Check review pictures for any issues.

A cat in a cat tree condo.

How Do I Get My Cat To Use A Cat Tree?

Try different locations and use different smells.

Cat’s enjoy areas with lots of sunlight exposure and more ventilation. Don’t put the tree in a dark corner.

Feline facial pheromone also helps to entice cats to want to approach their tree.

Bottom Line: Try different locations and use feline facial pheromones to attract cats.

A cat in a cat tree.

What cat tree do you need if you have multiple cats?

If you have multiple cats then the tree must be tall enough to give each cat a chance to find a spot. A cat tree also needs multiple condos for resting.

Usually, the dominant cat will occupy the higher level, so the other cat or cats need another level to rest for their own needs.

They should also be able to access sunlight, scratching material, and a condo space to rest.

Bottom Line: Find a cat tree with multiple condos and levels for multiple cats.

Two cats on a cat tree.

What is the best cat tree for large cats?

The best cat tree for big cats is one that is sturdy enough to contain their weight and has enough width to contain them properly.

If your cat is struggling to sit on a perch or can’t squeeze into a condo, it’s not a good tree for them.

Cat’s want a reasonable amount of space to stretch out, lay down, scratch, and enjoy themselves. This is similar to a cat carrier, which should be 50% larger than the cat for comfort.

By paying attention to your cat’s diet, you might be able to reduce their weight which will improve their ability to use a cat tree.

My article on setting your cat’s diet provides some great tips for that.

Bottom Line: The best cat tree for large cats should contain perches and condos 50% bigger than the cat for comfort.

A cat on a cat tree.

Are there cat trees for large cats?

Yes, there are cat trees marketed and designed for larger cats.

Be mindful of the size dimensions listed and the reviews from customers.

Take note of pictures and videos that customers have provided which give you an impression of whether the cat tree would accommodate your cat’s needs.

Every cat is different and you’ll need to assess your options carefully for best results.

Bottom Line: There are cat trees for large cats. Check the reviews to see whether the product is right for your needs.

How big of a cat tree should I get for a large cat?

Cat trees for large cats should be wide and easy to access.

Perches and condos should be at least 50% larger than your cat. Check the sizing on specs to make sure the tree is the right fit for your cat.

Bottom Line: Look for cat trees that provide enough room for a large cat to move.

Cat perching.

Is A Cat Tree Worth It?

It depends.

Cat trees are more important depending on how restricted the environment is. Indoor cats benefit more than outdoor cats with catios.

Even using some cardboard boxes helps cats enjoy the benefit of hiding and climbing to a certain extent.

My cat enjoyed jumping around my desk and cupboard. A cat tree is a convenient and safer way for your cat to enjoy all the benefits without jumping on your keyboard whilst you are on your PC.

Bottom Line: Cat trees are best for indoor cats with limited space to perch, play, and climb.

Outdoor cats benefit less from cat trees.

Conclusion: Best Cat Tree for Large Cats

In this article, I’ve talked about the best cat tree for large cats.

Cat trees are a form of environmental enrichment. They help reduce boredom and engage a cat’s instincts to climb, perch, and survey territory. A cat tree may reduce the risk of behavioral issues and weight gain.

When looking for the best cat tree for large cats, focus on the size of perches and condos, as well as durability. These structures should be 50% larger than your cat to allow room to move.

Speak with your vet for more help.

A cat.

Our Verdict: Best Cat Tree for Large Cats

Hey-bro Extra Large Multi-Level Cat Tree Condo

Durable for large cats

Easy to assemble

Two condos for hiding fun

Sisal scratching posts

Top perches may not be wide enough

No horizontal scratching options

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