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10 Best Wet Cat Foods Ranked For Health

Disclaimer

As a Chewy and Amazon affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases. This does not impact our reviews and comparisons.

Let’s get to the point.

Cats are carnivores.

Big cats. Small cats.

All cats.

What does that all mean? Well…it means cats are carnivores!

I hope I made that point clear (was it?).

For this reason the topic of cat food is not that hard. Give cats what they eat and your cat is in good shape.

Dry kibble tends to load up on grains and fillers cats don’t need. Wet foods are miles better on the ingredient front, but there’s some foods that are better than others.

In this article I’ve popped down my top 10 ranked wet cat foods that will make any cat lick their plates clean.

I’ve went ahead and sorted based on the following:

  • Cost
  • Ingredients
  • Nutrition
  • Taste

Where possible, I’ve even gotten my 5 cat review panel to find out whether these foods get the paws of approval.

I’m confident that any of these wet foods will be a superb choice to keep your cat healthy. So let’s get to it in that case…

The goal of this website is to help cat owners learn more about taking care of their cats. I am not a veterinarian and I recommend seeking the advice of a vet for any further questions. This article is not intended as a replacement for medical advice.

10 Best Wet Cat Foods

Feline Natural Chicken & Lamb Feast

Range: Feline Natural feast wet cat food

Feline Natural is the champion of the wet cat food scene. This brand uses only grass-fed premium animal foods in the pouch with no nasty fillers.

This cat food does the most things right compared to everything else we looked at. The nutrition holds up to such a high quality, you can very well use this food for almost any cat.

Still, the taste is a little exotic for some cats and may put a few off (at least in our testing). That and the price are the only things wrong here.

Total Score: 89/100

  • Ingredients: A+
  • Nutrition: A+
  • Taste: B-
  • Cost: B-
  • Trust: A+

Learn More: Feline Natural Cat Food Review

Key Features And Benefits

  • AFCO approved all stages
  • Made in New Zealand
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gum-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Legume-free
  • Suitable for food intolerances
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Everyday feeding option

Nutrition Analysis

  • Protein: 51.5%*
  • Carbohydrate: 2.1%
  • Fat: 36.1%
  • Fiber: 0.5%
  • Ash: 9.8%
  • Taurine: 0.5%
  • Calcium: phosphate ratio: 1.3:1
  • Magnesium: 0.10%
  • Calories/kg: 895
  • Calories/g: 4.6

Meat Mates Lamb Dinner

Range: Meat Mates wet cat food

Meat Mates is a crazy good cat food that is purrfection for health. I just wish they wouldn’t run out of stock…

The crappy availability and pricier price tag are the only issues here because you can give any cat Meat Mates wet canned foods. Our 5 cat review panel loved Meat Mates and licked their plates clean.

This food is also suitable for cats with allergies (lamb), intolerances, seniors, kittens. No bs in the tins either, so you get peace of mind.

Total Score: 88/100

  • Ingredients: A+
  • Nutrition: A+
  • Taste: A
  • Cost: B-
  • Trust: B+

Learn More: Meat Mates Cat Food Review

Key features and benefits

  • AAFCO approved all stages
  • Made in New Zealand
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gum-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea protein-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Dave’s Pet Food Turkey & Giblets

Range: Dave’s naturally healthy wet cat food

Dave’s naturally healthy wet cat food is one of the better budget choices. It’s low in carbohydrate and high in animal products.

The main knocks on this option are the added carrageenan and gums to the tin. This makes it a sketchy choice for cats with irritable stomachs.

Still, at an affordable price, this is a competitive option and hits the nutrition targets I like to see. Tin design is a little ugly though, but does that matter?

Total Score: 89/100

  • Ingredients: A
  • Nutrition: A
  • Taste: B
  • Cost: A
  • Trust: A

Key features and benefits

  • AAFCO approved adults
  • Made in the USA
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gum-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Hound & Gatos 98% Turkey & Liver

Range: Hound & Gatos wet cat food

Hound & Gatos offers a premium quality wet cat food. Their foods are an awesome choice for cats of all life stages.

The reason this cat food rates as the best is the superb ingredient quality. It’s all cat friendly stuff here, with no added carbohydrates.

It’s also ultra versatile and suitable for a range of health conditions including diabetes and kidney disease management. The only knock is the strong smell out the tin and missing nutrition info on taurine.

Total Score: 88/100

  • Ingredients: A
  • Nutrition: A+
  • Taste: A
  • Cost: B-
  • Trust: B+

Learn More: Hound & Gatos Cat Food Review

  • AAFCO approved all stages
  • Made in the USA
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Ziwi Peak Otago Valley Wet Cat Food

Range: Ziwi Peak Provenance Series

Ziwi Peak’s provenance series is an absolute monster of a cat food. It’s loaded with 5 grass-fed meats and fish from a range of New Zealand sources.

All this leads to the immense nutrition quality in the tin here, which will be perfect for any cat. Unlike Ziwi Peak’s other wet cat food range, the provenance series is chick pea free and ultra low in carbs.

All this points to easy digestion and awesome nutrition. This is a real winner, but it’s a bit pricey and exotic tasting for fussy cats.

Total Score: 88/100

  • Ingredients: A+
  • Nutrition: A+
  • Taste: B-
  • Cost: B-
  • Trust: A+

Learn More: Ziwi Peak Cat Food Review

  • AAFCO approved all stages
  • Made in the USA
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Instinct Original Pate Real Rabbit

Range: Instinct Original series

Instinct Original is a solid all-rounder cat food. Affordable with decent nutrition in the tin, and many satisfied cats.

Like many of the top foods in this list, Instinct is very low in carbs and grain free. There’s also no carrageenan or gums in the tin so this will help cats with suspect stomachs.

Strangely, Instinct don’t tell us the taurine content and they still use a few iffy things like peas. I really wish cat food brands stop the love affair with peas.

Total Score: 88/100

  • Ingredients: A
  • Nutrition: B+
  • Taste: A-
  • Cost: A-
  • Trust: A
  • AAFCO approved for adults
  • Made in the USA
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Sheba Roasted Turkey Entree

Range: Sheba Perfect Portions wet cat food

Sheba is as good as cat food gets on a budget, and my cat team loved it. They licked their trays clean.

Despite the budget price the ingredients are solid. All animal based stuff which is usually not the case when you check the more affordable foods.

Sheba is just a good wet cat food brand. If your cat turns their nose up at wet food, I recommend giving Sheba a try.

Total Score: 87/100

  • Ingredients: A-
  • Nutrition: B
  • Taste: A+
  • Cost: A-
  • Trust: A

Learn More: Sheba Cat Food Review

  • AAFCO approved all stages
  • Made in the USA
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Nulo Freestyle Duck & tuna Recipe

Range: Nulo Freestyle wet cat food

Nulo is another all-round wet cat food that hits most of the criteria for health.

There are some questionable ingredients that bring the score down (e.g. cranberries). Still, the carbs are reasonably low for what we look for (only 5.8% on a dry matter basis) and the protein content is excellent.

This is also a kidney friendly product with a high calcium to phosphate ratio. It’s senior friendly. It’s kitten friendly. It’s fussy cat friendly. What more is there to say about this one?

Total Score: 86/100

  • Ingredients: C+
  • Nutrition: A
  • Taste: A-
  • Cost: A
  • Trust: A+

Learn More: Nulo Cat Food Review

  • AAFCO approved all stages
  • Made in the USA
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Everyday feeding option
  • Wet cat food

Tiki Cat After Dark Chicken & Quail

Range: Tiki Cat after dark

Why is this product called After Dark? Is this where you serve great quality cat food with some jazz music?

I don’t know. In any case, what we have here is a low calorie cat food that is high in protein from premium animal food sources.

This is a great choice for overweight adult cats. Some cats might also like the authentic shreds texture. The calcium to phosphate ratio is low and not a sole food option for cats, so keep that in mind.

Total Score: 85/100

  • Ingredients: A+
  • Nutrition: B-
  • Taste: A-
  • Cost: B+
  • Trust: A
  • AAFCO approved for adults
  • Made in Thailand
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Occasional feeding only
  • Wet cat food

Fussie Cat Premium Tuna with Salmon

Range: Fussie Cat Premium wet cat food

You have to admit, Fussie Cat is a great name for a cat food. As the name suggests, it’s actually pretty darn good for fussy cats.

It’s a tuna first cat food line, and I don’t know about you but my cats love fish. Still, it’s best to limit tuna in your cats diet (as you should as well) due to mercury build up.

The filler ingredients like gums and carrageenan aren’t optimal for sensitive stomachs either.

All things considered, this is a solid occasional food option, but I wouldn’t be opting for it every day.

Total Score: 84/100

  • Ingredients: A-
  • Nutrition: B+
  • Taste: A
  • Cost: B-
  • Trust: A
  • AAFCO approved for adults
  • Made in Thailand
  • BPA free
  • Carrageenan-free
  • Gluten-free
  • Soy-free
  • Pea-free
  • Gum-free
  • Senior cat friendly
  • Kitten friendly
  • Adult cat friendly
  • Sensitive stomach friendly
  • Suitable for allergies
  • Food intolerance friendly
  • Suitable for weight control
  • Suitable for diabetes
  • Suitable for kidney disease
  • Suitable for diarrhea
  • Budget friendly
  • Suitable for picky cats
  • Occasional feeding only
  • Wet cat food

How Did I Choose These Cat Foods?

I didn’t have to change anything about the order of foods. That’s because the best cat foods are all wet ones.

I grade cat food based on 5 areas:

  • Nutrition
  • Ingredients
  • Taste (including results with my cat review team)
  • Cost
  • Trust

Based on those areas, I arrived at a final score out of 100.

I hope this analysis provides more value than ‘well let’s click on Amazon and copy paste’.

Anyone can do that, I think.

Let’s take a closer look at what each grading consists of and how each of these wet cat foods stack up.

Cool?

Ingredients

Cat foods have to list their ingredients by weight. The exception is a treat or topper (e.g. Applaws), since they aren’t main sources of nutrition.

The label on the front gives clues to the weighting based on the words used.

Nice…but there’s no way to know the percentage weight of every food item.

Not nice!

What this means is a guessing game. I can say ‘well look for the first 5 ingredients being meat based’.

But then the next ingredients are 50 shades of peas and grains.

So what would that even mean?

To try get around this I made a tool called the Ingredient Quality Calculator. I estimate the relative weighing of each ingredient and it’s value.

Meaty ingredients get the highest score. Grains, peas, corn, and other fillers score lowly.

The more grains and legumes the higher risk of food intolerance problems (e.g. diarrhea).

At the end of the day, it’s about the ingredients themselves and how much of them.

That’s a known and half-known element.

Here’s how our top 10 best wet cat food selections rate by ingredients:

Nutrition

I score nutrition based on meeting a set of criteria from review papers. This is as a ‘best practice’ guideline for cats.

If the food hits all targets, it’s a 100/100. Anything outside targets incurs a penalty.

A 100/100 food is a food you can put on any cats plate for great results. It’s a complete meal.

Here’s our 10 best wet foods by nutrition:

Taste

Ok so you’ve got something that has good nutrition. Good ingredients.

But how does it taste?

It’s obvious, but if your cat doesn’t eat the food then what’s the point?

Cats are neophobic. They take some time to warm to new things. It’s hard to judge a cat food from one attempt.

Here’s an analogy:

Say I serve you snails. I assume most people don’t eat snails.

I don’t. Maybe they taste great, like chicken.

The first serving will be a tentative I’m sure. They probably have a weird texture and smell.

Look it’s the best analogy I could think of. Point being, give your cat a chance to like it.

I’ve tested as many foods with my 5 cat panel as possible. I then looked at reviews.

Of course there’s some error with customer reviews. A low review count can give a false result.

So take this analysis with a pinch of salt. I mean don’t put salt on your cat’s food…you know what I mean.

Also consider is there’s a ‘sweet spot’ to a cats taste preference.

Anything around 50% protein, 38% fat and 12% carbohydrates or less works best. Cat foods at this range have a higher chance of success, all things being equal.

Here’s the top 10 wet cat foods by ‘tastiness’.

Cost

Cost is always changing due to inflation and normal economic cycles.

I’ve taken the average cost of cat food on the market as of the writing of this article.

I’ve then used an equation to compare cat food based on that average. If one cat food price rises, all should rise relative to it.

Make sense?

That way, you get a ‘relative’ idea of what’s more affordable and what’ more expensive.

Here are the top 10 wet cat foods by cost:

Trust

This is difficult, who do you trust?

I look at recalls. More recalls are a sign of possible trust issues.

Missing information is also something I marked down for. If a cat food brand doesn’t disclose all information, it makes it harder to recommend.

That makes it’s harder to trust or have confidence recommending the food.

Here are my top 10 wet cat foods rated by trust:

Buying Guide: AKA How to Choose the Best Wet Cat Food That Your Cat Will LOVE!

I’m confident those 10 wet food picks will get the job done for 99% of people. We could end the article here…pick one of those foods and give it a try.

I’ve explained my grading process. It’s there to help you.

But here you, so I’m going to give you more information on what to look for. I’ll help you become a mastermind cat food sleuth to cut through the fluff.

In the beginning…

For as long as mankind has known, the entire cat family tree is full of carnivores. Cats are part of the carnivora order of the animal kingdom so how much more carnivore can you get?

Not enough, evidently.

The cat food market continues to hammer down costs at the expense of your cats health.

Wet cat food is usually better than dry cat food for ingredients and nutrition. Still, there’s still a few mines to dodge…

To make that search easy, here’s what to look for:

  • Over 40% protein on a dry matter basis
  • Under 10% carbohydrate on a dry matter basis
  • Look for fewer ‘fillers’ like gums, carrageenan, grains, potato, rice bran, and legumes
  • A range of flavors your cat enjoys
  • Less than 15% fiber on a dry matter basis for senior cats
  • Has a texture your cat prefers (think about what they enjoyed as kittens)
  • (Preferably) A calcium: phosphate ratio above 1:1
  • (Preferably) Fat around 25-40% on a dry matter basis
  • (Preferably) Named animal food sources (e.g. lamb kidney) over by-products
  • (Preferably) AAFCO approved for all life stages

That’s about it.

What you don’t need to look at is the label’s front. You know what they say about judging a book by it’s cover?

Well, that applies in spades in the Cat Food World.

There’s a few laws about labelling which contain some loop holes. Wording is often misleading.

Read more about labelling here.

What matters most is looking at the fine print on the back or side. That gives you what you need to know.

If you stick to this criteria, you’ll find something good. The options I’ve listed in the article meet almost all those points.

Our top rated choice, Feline Natural, hits all of them which is why it’s the Master Cat Food.

What Wet Cat Food is Best For An Older Cat?

The best choice for older cats is high calorie and protein wet food. Cats over the age of 11 years need 6-8g/kg of protein per day to maintain muscle strength. This is due to older cats having less ability to digest protein.

Animal-based protein is of higher quality than grain-based protein. Animal protein is easier to digest and has more essential amino acids (e.g. taurine).

Senior cats benefit from omega 3 fatty acids for joint function. Cats can’t convert plant-based omega 3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid) into essential fatty acids.

Some marketed senior cat foods are high in fiber and low energy. This is not the best choice for an older cat unless they need to lose weight.

Our criteria is made to help all cats including seniors get what they need.

Learn More:

What Wet Cat Food is Best For Kittens?

Kittens need a high calorie and protein diet. This is due to their fast growth in the first few weeks and months of life. Look for cat food that’s AAFCO approved for all life stages.

You’ll also notice food labelled for kittens.

The main benefit of these foods is added calcium. This is needed for strong bones.

Learn More:

What Wet Cat Food is Best for a Sensitive Stomach?

If your cat has a sensitive stomach then try a different cat food. Avoid wheat, legumes and other grain-based products. See a vet if the problem persists.

If your cat is vomiting or has diarrhea they may have a food intolerance and/or allergy. Other reasons include parasites, which is common in shelter raised cats.

Cat’s can get diarrhea from eating too many carbohydrates (usually from dry cat food). Cat’s have a limited ability to digest carbs and they even impair protein digestion.

Some cats are sensitive to fillers such as carrageenan and xanthan gum.

Also, cats are intolerant to many vegetables in the diet (e.g. onion and garlic). So, there’s not much you can feed your cat isn’t it?

Learn More:

Why Are Carbohydrates A Problem in Cat Food?

Cat’s have no requirement for carbohydrates as carnivores. They have fewer digestive enzymes for carbohydrates digestion. Their liver cannot adapt to high carbohydrate diets. Carbohydrates can lead to digestive issues and high blood sugar.

Grains are a high carbohydrate food. They include foods and ingredients such as:

  • Rice
  • Brewers rice
  • Corn
  • Corn gluten meal
  • Wheat
  • Wheat gluten meal
  • Tapioca starch
  • Oats

Although processing improves digestibility, it’s the amount of these foods which is the problem.

A small amount (less than 10% on a dry matter basis) is ok. More than that is not.

Grains are also a source of insoluble fiber. This is a problem for constipation (common in older cats). Corn gluten meal decreases fecal moisture compared to fish meal which increases the risk of constipation.

When given the choice, cats in research settings prefer a low carbohydrate food option.

In short:

Carbohydrate has no upside and all downside.

Frequently Asked Questions

How should I introduce new wet cat food?

Here is how to introduce a new food into your cat’s diet.

  1. Start by adding a ratio of 25% of the new food into 75% of the old food
  2. Slowly increase the amount of new food and decrease the old food
  3. Transition to the new food by 2 weeks

Cats are neophobic which means they are averse to eating new foods. This is why you need to give your cat time to warm up to the new type of food and flavors.

Speaking of warming up:

Cat’s prefer their meats served warm (between 15-50 degrees Celsius) as this improves smell. This means a brief zap in the microwave helps get your cat interested in their food.

Is wet or dry food better for cats?

Wet cat food is usually better for cats.

This is because wet cat food provides a ratio of dietary nutrients in line with your cat’s evolutionary requirement.

Canned cat food is also high in moisture to keep your cat adequately hydrated.

A mixture of wet food and (good quality) dry cat foods is another reasonable option. This allows your cat to fine-tune their diet to find the sweet spot that works for them.

The is no need for dry cat food.

Research suggests that not feeding a cat dry food is linked with a reduced risk of obesity.

What is the best inexpensive wet cat food?

Good inexpensive wet canned food choices include:

  • Sheba
  • Iams
  • Fancy Feast
  • Purina ONE

These options tend to perform well when looking at overall nutrition.

Generally, it’s easier to find affordable quality wet cat food than dry cat food.

Check out my article on the best cheap cat food for more.

Why do cats need a high protein diet?

Protein is the major dietary requirement for cats. Cat’s need a constant supply of protein.

Most wet cat foods are an excellent source of protein.

Products containing animal-based food sources such as chicken, turkey, lamb, salmon, rabbit, and beef contain a lot of protein and are good for cats.

Cats require animal foods to provide nutrition and do not have the physiological characteristics for plant digestion.

A cat’s body features a low intestine-to-body ratio, sharper carnassial teeth designed for tearing meat, night vision, and a wider detection of sound frequencies than humans.

This means cats are adapted to and thrive off animal-based foods.

The constituent of protein is amino acids

Amino acids form bone, hair, skin, teeth, muscles, and other organs. If your cat does not get enough protein, these structures would waste away.  Used for energy in times of food shortage, the protein in a cat’s body becomes emergency fuel via gluconeogenesis. 

Gluconeogenesis breaks down consumed protein for glucose.  The brain needs glucose, among other bodily tissues that are dependent on glucose.

When given a low protein diet, cats do not have the ability to downregulate the loss of protein in order to conserve bodily protein stores.

In other words, you must give your cat a sufficient amount of protein daily to prevent muscle loss. 

A cat’s diet needs to be at least 16% protein by energy otherwise they will lose muscle mass and strength.

Why do cats need fat in their diet?

Fat is another important source of energy for cats found in animal and plant foods.

Fat improves the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins – which are important in cats since they must obtain vitamin A and D from animal foods. Read my article on what to feed your cat to find out more.

Cats also cannot convert linoleic acid into arachidonic acid [AA].

Inflammatory processes require AA.  Inflammation sounds bad but this is a necessary process for general healing in the body. 

Plant-based products such as linseed and canola oil contain a high amount of linoleic acid, however, this is of no benefit to cats due to the inability to convert these fats into AA.

Fish oil is sometimes added to canned wet cat food products to provide omega 3 fatty acids.

Do cats need carbohydrate in their cat food?

Cats are obligate carnivores and generally consume fewer carbohydrates.

Cats have a very limited amount of salivary amylase which is an enzyme that helps digest carbohydrates.

Cats also have low amounts of disaccharidases (needed to digest sugar molecules) and these levels don’t increase in response to dietary carbohydrate intake. In other words, giving a cat more carbohydrates won’t help them produce more enzymes needed to break down carbohydrates in the diet.

On top of this, cats don’t have taste receptors for sweetness. When provided water with or without sugar, cats had no preference for sweet water. Whilst cats can digest some carbohydrates, an excess may lead to diarrhea and flatulence.

In general, I recommend keeping the carbohydrate level of a cat’s diet low (around 10%).

Are meat by-products a good source of animal protein?

There are three types of meats found in cat food:

  • Meat
  • Meat by-products
  • Meat meal

The ranking of quality goes from meat (being the best quality) to a meal (being the lowest quality).

Wet foods tend to use more meat and meat by-products. Dry cat food tends to contain more meat meals (rendered heat-treated meat).

Meat by-products include many different parts of the animal not including hair, horns, teeth, hooves, or manure.

Cats rely on their sense of smell to select food. Meat by-products may contain a less fresh source of meat that smells less enticing – thus reducing the taste of the food.

Read more about label reading and meat by-products here.

Conclusion

In this article, I’ve reviewed the best wet cat food for your cat’s health.

Cats are obligate carnivores and thrive off a higher protein and fat diet. The best wet cat food should contain nutrients that reflect your cat’s evolved dietary needs with easy-to-digest animal foods.

Speak with a vet for more assistance in finding the best-canned cat food for your needs.

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